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Emergency Measures Drafted In As Fuel Crisis Deepens

The Government has suspended competition laws and is considering drafting in the Army to drive tankers, in a bid to end the ongoing fuel crisis taking place across the UK.

With a shortage of HGV drivers post-Brexit who are able to deliver petrol and diesel from refinery depots to filling-station forecourts, matters have come to a head with customers panic-buying fuel – resulting in many stations throughout the country seeing increased demand, long queues, and even selling out of petrol and diesel entirely.

In response to the crisis, Grant Shapps, the Secretary of State for Transport, has urged consumers to only fill up their cars with fuel if they absolutely need to.

And Kwasi Kwarteng, the Business Secretary, went further by meeting with oil companies and retailers on Sunday [September 26, 2021], before enacting a temporary suspension of the UK’s competition laws to allow fuel suppliers to share information.

This should allow them to target deliveries to areas of the country where petrol and diesel supplies are particularly low.

The next stage would be to draft in Army drivers to get additional tankers moving, to try and stop the scenes of chaos seen at many petrol stations across the country in recent days.

Images circling on social media channels have depicted many people filling up multiple Jerry cans of extra fuel as the crisis bites – despite multiple warnings from the Government to only buy as much fuel as is strictly necessary. Currently, only Esso and BP are reporting ongoing issues with supplies. On Friday [September 24, 2021], around 20 of BP’s 1200 national forecourts were closed due to a lack of fuel.

It was originally BP and Tesco announcing they were struggling with fuel supplies which triggered the latest fuel crisis, but Tesco itself is now suggesting it has ample supply of petrol and diesel.

Other supermarket chains, including Morrisons, Co-op, Sainsbury’s and Asda, have also announced they have no issue with fuel shortages.

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