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Every New-Build Home in England To Get An Electric Vehicle Charger

The Government has announced new legislation which will make it mandatory for all new-build homes in England to include an electric vehicle charging wallbox. The change will begin as soon as this winter (2021), according to transport Minister Rachel Maclean.

The move is a major step towards a wholesale switch to electric cars and vans on UK roads, as the Government attempts to pave the way for the ban on sales of new petrol and diesel cars in 2030. Around £1.3bn has been set aside to finance a huge expansion of the electric vehicle charging infrastructure, including public charging points and home installations.

There are currently 26,000 public charging points in 16,000 locations in the UK, the majority of them “fast”, which means they’re capable of charging a car at speeds between 7kW and 22kW. The very quickest public charging points, called “ultra rapid”, can charge a car at 100kW-plus rate although presently only the most advanced EVs, like the Hyundai Ioniq 5 and Audi e-tron gt, can utilise those. In both cases the car’s battery can be charged up to 80% capacity from zero in well under an hour. Today there are around 1200 ultra rapid chargers across UK sites, including motorway service stations.

Wallbox chargers of the type that the Government has mandated for every new home usually charge at a 7kW rate, which will get a typical electric car fully charged in under 8 hours, often less; most EV owners plug their cars into their wallboxes overnight, making 7kW speed more than adequate.

The Government’s EV charging scheme also requires that the home units are capable of smart charging, a kind of ‘car-to-grid’ communication that prevents the electricity network from being overloaded. For individual users it means they can choose how much charge to put into their car and at what time, which should save money during off-peak hours.

According to a report by the Government’s Competition & Markets Authority, the UK will need more than 10 times the amount of public charging points (at least 250,000) by 2030 if it’s to meet demand. On average there are 34 charging points per 100,000 people in England today, but the number varies geographically, with London having 80 per 100,000 while the North-West region has only 21.

This new build homes scheme is a step in the right direction though, and it comes at a time when electric cars themselves are making big leaps in battery range and energy efficiency. Not just at the top end of the market, either. The new Skoda Enyaq iV and Volkswagen ID.3 are capable of 330 miles from a single charge (WLTP official average range), and even the Renault Zoe can achieve 245 miles.

Interested in leasing an electric car and want more info? Visit our electric car guide.

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